PROFILE
Name:
Treat Williams
Birth Date:
December 1, 1951
Birth Place:
Rowayton, Connecticut, USA
Height:
5' 10" (1.78 m)
Nationality:
American
Famous for:
His role in 'Deadly Hero'
BIOGRAPHY
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Andy the Everwood

Background:

Prolific character actor Treat Williams began acting on stage and made his Broadway debut in ''Grease'' (1976), in which he eventually took over the leading role of Danny Zuko. His later Broadway credits included the musicals ''Over Here'' and ''Pirates of Penzance'' and the reader's-theatre exercise ''Love Letters.''

He entered the big screen in the mid 1970s with a role in the film adaptation of Terrence McNally's play, "The Ritz" (1976). He has since played major roles in such films as "Hair" (1979), "Prince of the City" (1981), "Once Upon a Time in America" (1984), "Smooth Talk" (1985), "Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead" (1995), "Mulholland Falls" (1996), "The Phantom" (1996), "The Devil's Own" (1997), "Deep Rising" (1998), "The Deep End of the Ocean" (1999), "Hollywood Ending" (2002), and "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed & Fabulous" (2005).

Meanwhile, on the small screen, the Emmy and Golden Globe nominated actor has starred in the TV movies "Dempsey" (1983), "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1984), "J. Edgar Hoover" (1987), "Echoes in the Darkness" (1987), "The Late Shift" (1996), "Journey to the Center of the Earth" (1999), and "Guilty Hearts" (2002). He also portrayed mercenary-turned-teacher Karl Thomasson in the sequels "The Substitute 2: School's Out" (1998), "The Substitute 3: Winner Takes All" (1999), and "The Substitute: Failure Is Not an Option" (2001; V). Additionally, he made his directorial debut with "Texan" (1994), an acclaimed 26-minute short film written by David Mamet.

He starred as lawyer "Eddie Dodd" (1991) in the ABC legal drama series of the same name, and acted opposite Shelley Long in CBS’ sitcom "Good Advice" (1993-1994), playing divorce attorney Jack Harold. From 2002 to 2006, he starred as neurosurgeon Dr. Andrew 'Andy' Brown in the popular WB primetime TV drama "Everwood" and in 2007, he headed the cast of the short-lived TNT medical drama "Heartland," playing heart surgeon Dr. Nathaniel 'Nate' Grant.

On a more personal note, the 5' 10" actor, who briefly dated Emmy-winning actress Dana Delany in the early 1980s, is now happily married to Pam Van Sant, with whom he has two children.


Pro Pilot

Childhood and Family:

In Rowayton, Connecticut, Richard Treat Williams was born on December 1, 1951, to Richard Norman Williams, a corporate executive, and Marion Andrew, an antiques dealer. The nickname "Treat" comes from one of his maternal ancestors, Robert Treat Payne, whose signature appears on the Declaration of Independence.

Treat went to the elite New England prep school, Kent School, in Kent, Connecticut, the same high school attended by Ted Danson, Peter Farrelly and Seth MacFarlane. He then enrolled in Franklin & Marshall College, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and received his BA in 1973.

In June 1988, Treat married his present wife, Pam Van Sant. They have two children together, a son named Gil Williams (born in 1992) and a daughter named Elinor Williams (born in October 1998). They now live in Utah where Treat's show ''Everwood'' was shot. The family also has a home in New York City and a house in Manchester, Vermont.

Treat was a professional pilot for a year in the early 1980s and is a qualified pilot who first took to the skies in high school. He owned an airplane company that provided the planes for the movie ''Con Air.'' Treat is a certified Flight Instructor.


Heartland

Career:

While studying at Franklin & Marshall College, Treat Williams worked summers at the nearby Fulton Repertory Theatre in Lancaster where he performed in classics, contemporary dramas and musicals. Following graduation, he headed to New York City and immediately landed his first acting job in 1973 as an understudy to John Travolta in Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey's musical "Grease," in which he eventually took over the role. The next year, he had a prominent supporting role in the Broadway musical "Over Here," starring the Andrews Sisters and Travolta.

Williams made his feature film debut in director Richard Lester's film adaptation of Terrence McNally's play, "The Ritz" (1976), with Jack Weston, Rita Moreno, Jerry Stiller, Kaye Ballard and F. Murray Abraham. He wrapped up the decade with a highly-praised performance as the hippie leader George Berger in Milos Forman's film version of the 1968 Broadway musical, "Hair" (1979; opposite John Savage), for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year in a Motion Picture – Male.

In the early 1980s, Williams earned acclaim for his impressive performance as the New York cop in Sidney Lumet's take on Robert Daley's 1978 book, "Prince of the City" (1981), which earned him another Golden Globe nomination, this time for Best Motion Picture Actor – Drama.

After returning to Broadway to succeed Kevin Kline in the comic opera "The Pirates of Penzance" (1981), Williams made his TV movie debut in the CBS biopic "Dempsey" (1983). He followed it up with the CBS scorching adaptation of the 1948 Tennessee Williams' play, "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1984), playing Stanley Kowalski opposite Ann-Margaret's Blanche DuBois, and was nominated for another Golden Globe Award, this time for Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV. He also co-starred with Peter Coyote, Stockard Channing, and Robert Loggia in the made-for-television mini-series adaptation of Joseph Wambaugh's book, "Echoes in the Darkness" (1987; CBS) and portrayed the title role of the late FBI director in the Showtime's biopic, "J. Edgar Hoover" (1987).

Meanwhile, moviegoers could catch Williams co-starring as Jimmy Conway O'Donnell in Sergio Leone's gangster epic "Once Upon a Time in America" (1984; starring Robert De Niro and James Woods) and as the charming and menacing Arnold Friend, opposite Laura Dern, in Joyce Chopra's romantic drama "Smooth Talk" (1985). For his performance in the latter film, loosely based on the 1966 short story "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" by Joyce Carol Oates, Williams received an Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Male Lead.

Entering the 1990s, Williams starred as lawyer "Eddie Dodd" (1991) in the ABC legal drama series of the same name, and acted opposite Shelley Long in CBS’ sitcom "Good Advice" (1993-1994), playing divorce attorney Jack Harold. He also made his directorial debut with "Texan" (1994), a 26-minute short film written by David Mamet. The film premiered at the Telluride Film Festival and won the Best Short Award at the Ft. Lauderdale Film Festival and the New Director's Award at the Aspen Short Film Festival. It was later aired on Showtime's "Directed By" series.

Williams next offered a fine villainous turn as Critical Bill, opposite Andy Garcia, Steve Buscemi, and Christopher Walken, in Gary Fleder's romantic crime/drama film "Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead" (1995) and co-starred as the rich madman Xander Drax in Simon Wincer's action/adventure movie "The Phantom" (1996; starring Billy Zane), which was based on Lee Falk's comic strip of the same name. He also garnered an Emmy nomination (Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Special) and a Golden Satellite Award nomination (Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television) for his turn as Mike Ovitz, a former talent agent and Hollywood powerhouse who served as the head of the Creative Artists Agency from 1975 to 1995, in the HBO drama "The Late Shift" (1996; with Kathy Bates, John Michael Higgins, and Daniel Roebuck), which was based on the book by Bill Carter.

Williams spent the rest of the 1990s playing a villain in Alan J. Pakula's drama/thriller "The Devil's Own" (1997; starring Harrison Ford and Brad Pitt) and starring as professional mercenary Karl Thomasson (a role originally created by Tom Berenger) in the HBO sequels "The Substitute 2: School's Out" (1998), "The Substitute 3: Winner Takes All" (1999) and "The Substitute 4: Failure Is Not an Option" (2001; V).

Williams portrayed Michelle Pfeiffer's husband in the film adaptation of a 1996 best-selling novel by Jacquelyn Mitchard, "The Deep End of the Ocean" (1999) and led the cast of the USA miniseries "Journey to the Center of the Earth" (1999), a remake of Jules Verne's classic. He also returned to the New York stage as the star of the Off-Broadway musical "Captains Courageous," Jerry Mitchell's musical staging of Rudyard Kipling's novel that opened at the Manhattan Theatre Club, in New York on February 16, 1999.

After playing Jonathan Jackson's father in the taut thriller "Skeletons in the Closet" (2001; also featuring Linda Hamilton), Williams returned to Broadway to co-star as Buddy in the Broadway revival of the musical "Follies" (2001). The following year, he was cast as neurosurgeon Dr. Andrew 'Andy' Brown in the WB primetime TV drama "Everwood." He played the lead character from its pilot on September 16, 2002, to its finale on June 5, 2006, and his performance earned him two Screen Actors Guild Award nominations for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series in 2003 and 2004. He also received a Golden Satellite Award nomination for Best Actor in a Series, Drama, and a Teen Choice Award nomination for Choice TV Parental Units.

During his "Everwood" stint, Williams acted in Woody Allen's "Hollywood Ending" (2002) and in the CBS crime drama "Guilty Hearts" (2002), as a cheating husband whose mistress comes to believe he may have killed his wife. He also performed in the play "War Letters" (February 2002), which was based on the book "War Letters: Extraordinary Correspondence from American Wars.” He was then cast as FBI Assistant Director Walter Collins in the hit comedy "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous" (2005; starring Sandra Bullock).

Williams had a recurring role as David Morton (2006) in the ABC Emmy winning family series "Brothers & Sisters" and starred as heart surgeon Dr. Nathaniel 'Nate' Grant, whose dedication to his work takes a toll on his health and his relationships, in the TNT medical drama series "Heartland." Premiering on June 18, 2007, the show was canceled on August 31, 2007, because of disappointing ratings. Meanwhile, Williams co-starred in a true-to-life comedy movie inspired by actual events, "Moola" (2007; starring William Mapother) and in a mystery-thriller film called "The Hideout" (2007; starring Laura Morante).


Awards:
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