Name:
Martie Maguire
Birth Date:
October 12, 1969
Birth Place:
York, Pennsylvania, USA
Height:
5' 7''
Nationality:
American
Famous for:
A founding member and leader of the Dixie Chicks
Profession:
Country songwriter, Musician
BIOGRAPHY
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Wide Open Spaces

Background:

American singer, songwriter and musician Martie Maguire is famous as the founding member and leader of the multiple Grammy Award-winning female alternative country-rock group Dixie Chicks. Playing the fiddle, violin and mandolin, alongside younger sister Emily Robison on dobro, banjo, and guitar and Natalie Maines in lead vocals (joined the group in 1995), Martie and the Dixie Chicks received their first two Grammy Awards for the 1998 album “Wide Open Space” (1998), their major-label debut that has gone quadruple platinum. The Billboard No. 1 hit album “Fly” (1999) and the song “Ready to Run,” which Martie co-wrote for the “Runaway Bride” soundtrack, brought two additional Grammy Awards in 2000 in the categories of Best Country Album and Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals, respectively. They also won Grammy Awards for the 2002 album “Home,” the singles “Long Time Gone” (2001) and “Top Of The World” (2005) as well as the instrumental song “Lil' Jack Slade.” In 2007, Martie and her band mates received five Grammy awards thanks to the new album “Taking the Long Way” (2006) and the single “Not Ready to Make Nice.” Other honors the group has earned include Country Music Association Awards, American Music Awards, a CMT Johnny Cash Visionary Award, a Billboard Music Award and a Juno Award.

Now the wife of Gareth Maguire, whom she married in 2001, Martie gave birth to twin daughters, Eva and Katie, in 2004.

Martie and the Dixie Chicks have participated in a number of charities concerning various issues like political activism, environmental causes, and other causes. They helped raise money for the victims of 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina as well as actively supported Conservation International, an organization trying to improve and enforce change on both a grassroots and corporate level to decrease global warming.

In her free time, Martie likes writing songs, visiting friends in Hawaii and spending time with her family. She keeps a horse named Dolly as her pet and mentions movies like “Terms of Endearment,” “Austin Powers,” “The Color Purple” and “When Harry Met Sally” among her favorites. The blonde beauty idolizes Meg Ryan, Anthony Hopkins and Adrian Pasdar.


Music Prodigy

Childhood and Family:

Martha Elenor Erwin, nicknamed Martie, was born on October 12, 1969, in York, Pennsylvania, to teachers Paul Erwin and Barbara Trask. Raised in Addison, Texas, the second of three girls was introduced to music at an early age. She started playing classical violin at age 5 and added the fiddle to her endeavors by the time she was 12. In high school, she actively participated in her school orchestra. Martie also plays the guitar, bass and mandolin.

On June 17, 1995, Martie married pharmaceutical representative Ted Seidel and subsequently changed her last name to his. She became the stepmother of Carter, Ted's son from a previous relationship. The marriage ended in divorce in November 1999. In June 2001, Martie became engaged to Gareth Maguire, a Roman Catholic educator and actor from Northern Ireland. The couple married on August 10, 2001, in a civil ceremony in Hawaii and welcomed their twin girls, Eva Ruth Maguire and Kathleen 'Katie' Emilie Maguire, three years later on April 27, 2004. Since the marriage, Martie has gone with the name Martie Maguire.

Martie and her husband are expecting a new edition to their family later this year.


Ready to Run

Career:

Texas-raised Martie Maguire shared an early passion for music with her younger sister, Emily. Under the guidance of their mother, the twosome learned to play various stringed instruments while still in elementary school. They formed a Bluegrass band group called “Blue Night Express” in 1984. At the time, Martie was 15 years old and Emily was 12. However, it was not until 1989 that they started the now famous Dixie Chicks, along with former members Robin Lynn Macy (vocals, guitar) and Laura Lynch (vocals, bass).

Combining good looks and fresh musical talent, Martie and the Dixie Chicks soon gained a reputation in Dallas, Texas. They became opening-acts for artists like George Jones, Garth Brooks and Emmylou Harris, and in 1993, they rose to fame by performing at the Grand Ole Opry and the Inaugural Ball of President Clinton. By this time, the group had released three independently-produced albums: “Thank Heavens for Dale Evans” (1990), “Little Ol' Cowgirl” (1992) and “Shouldn't a Told You That” (1993). All the albums were well-received by fans.

Following the departure of Macy and Lynch, Martie and Emily recruited the Berklee College of Music-educated Natalie Maines as the Dixie Chicks new vocalist in 1995. Also that year, the group signed with Monument Records. “Wide Open Spaces,” their first major label album, was launched three years later in 1998. The first single, “I Can Love You Better,” was a Top 10 country hit, but it was the follow-up, “There's Your Trouble,” penned by Mark Selby and Tia Sillers, that made the country group a chart-topper and a Grammy winner in the category of Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals. An immediate success, the album sold more than 12 million copies in the United States and became the group's breakthrough commercial success.

Martie and her band members were soon flooded with numerous offers to appear on popular television talk shows. Their increasing status was further verified when they were asked to perform at the 20th Lilith Fair tour. In August 1999, they resurfaced with “Fly,” which rose to No. 1 on the Billboard 200 as well as became a No. 1 hit on both the Top Country Albums and Top Internet Albums’ chart. Spawning such popular singles as “Cowboy Take Me Away,” “Goodbye Earl,” “Ready to Run,” “Without You” and “If I Fall You're Going Down With Me,” the album brought the Dixie Chicks their next diamond certification, making them the only female group to have collected two RIAA Diamond Awards in history, and a Grammy for Best Country Album. The group also netted a Country Music Association award for Vocal Group of the Year and Entertainer of the Year, an American Music Favorite Country Band, Duo or Group and the 2000 Flameworthy Award.

Martie co-wrote the single “Ready to Run,” which was included on the soundtrack of the Julia Roberts and Richard Gere vehicle “Runaway Bride” (1999). It peaked at No 2 on the Hot Country Singles & Tracks and won a 2000 Grammy for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.

“Home,” their first album with Columbia, was launched in 2002. Celebrated for its acoustic bluegrass sound, it won three Grammys for Best Country Album, Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals (“Long Time Gone”) and Best Country Instrumental Performance (“Lil' Jack Slade”), two American Music awards for Favorite Country Album and Favorite Country Band, Duo or Group, a Country Music Association for Vocal Group of the Year, and other awards, including a 2002 Billboard Music for Country Duo/Group of the Year. Apart from the award-winning “Long Time Gone” and “Lil' Jack Slade,” “Home” also produced their biggest pop crossover hit, “Landslide” (No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100), previously made famous by Fleetwood Mac, and the No. 1 country hit “Travelin' Soldier.” However, after lead singer Natalie Maines publicly expressed her views on President Bush's decision to invade Iraq, Dixie Chicks had to deal with boycotts from many stations that caused “Travelin' Soldier” to disappear from the charts. In 2003, Martie and her groups released their first live album, “Top of the World Tour: Live.” It peaked at No. 3 on the Top Country Albums and No. 27 on the Billboard 200. It won a Grammy in 2005 for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.

The seventh album, “Taking the Long Way,” was released in May 2006. Produced by Rick Rubin, the album peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard 200, the Billboard Top Country Albums, and the United World Chart. It won two Grammys for Best Country Album and Album of the Year and the country-pop single “Not Ready to Make Nice” won the group three Grammys for Record of the Year, Song of the Year and Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. As of July 2007, “Taking the Long Way” has received double-platinum certification.


Awards:

  • Grammy: Record of the Year, Song of the Year and Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, “Not Ready to Make Nice,” 2007

  • Grammy: Best Country Album and Album of the Year, “Taking the Long Way,” 2007

  • Juno: International Album of the Year, “Taking the Long Way,” 2007

  • ACLU Bill of Rights Award: 2006

  • Grammy: Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, “Top Of The World,” 2005

  • Grammy: Best Country Album, “Home,” 2003

  • Grammy: Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, “Long Time Gone,” 2003

  • Grammy: Best Country Instrumental Performance, “Lil' Jack Slade,” 2003

  • American Music: Favorite Country Band, Duo or Group, 2003

  • American Music: Favorite Country Album, “Home,” 2003

  • People's Choice: Favorite Musical Group or Band, 2002

  • Billboard Music: Country Duo/Group of the Year, 2002

  • CMT Johnny Cash Visionary Award: 2002

  • Country Music Association: Vocal Group of the Year, 2002

  • American Music: Favorite Country Band, Duo or Group, 2001

  • Grammy: Best Country Album, “Fly,” 2000

  • Grammy: Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, “Ready to Run,” 2000

  • Country Music Association: Album of the Year, “Fly,” 2000

  • Country Music Association: Vocal Group of the Year and Entertainer of the Year, 2000

  • Country Music Association: Music Video of the Year, “Goodbye Earl,” 2000

  • Flameworthy Award: 2000

  • Grammy: Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, “There’s Your Trouble,” 1999

  • Grammy: Best Country Album, “Wide Open Spaces,” 1999

  • Country Music Association: Single of the Year, “Wide Open Spaces,” 1999

  • Country Music Association: Vocal Group of the Year, 1999

  • Country Music Association: Music Video of the Year, “Wide Open Spaces,” 1999

  • Country Music Association: Horizon Award, 1998

  • Country Music Association: Vocal Group of the Year, 1998

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