Name:
Marisol Nichols
Birth Date:
November 2, 1973
Birth Place:
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Height:
5' 4
Nationality:
American
Profession:
Actress
Education:
Naperville North High School in Naperville, Illinois
BIOGRAPHY
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Vegas Vacation Girl

Background:

Beginning her acting jobs on television since the mid of 1990s, Marisol Nichols caught moviegoers’ attention as Audrey Griswold, the teenage daughter of the fictitious Griswold family (Chevy Chase and Beverly D'Angelo played her parents while Ethan Embry as her teen brother), in the comedy Vegas Vacation (1997). In 2005, she played Detective Karen Bettancourt in Stephen Bochco's cop drama "Blind Justice" (ABC) and most recently starred as Sonya Quintano (2006) in the ABC series “In Justice.” She is also set to appear on 20th Century Fox's “24,” which returns to Fox January 2007 on Monday nights.

In 2001, the 5' 4" tall Mexican descendant actress received the distinguished Golden Eagle Award for the most promising actress. The stunning brunette beauty who the camera adores was also featured in the July 2005 issue of Emmy Magazine and the October 2005 issue of ESTYLO magazine.

Off screen, Nichols is an activist, spokesperson and volunteer supervisor for Criminon, an international, non-profit organization, which addresses the cause of criminality and seeks to rehabilitate inmates. She is also a Commissioner and spokesperson for Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR), a non-profit, public benefit organization dedicated to investigating and exposing psychiatric violations of human rights. Nichols is a member of the Church of Scientology.


Mexican Blood

Childhood and Family:

Born in Chicago, Illinois, on November 2, 1973, Marisol Nichols, the oldest of three and has two younger brothers, went to Naperville North High School in Naperville, Illinois, and attended College of DuPage in Glen Ellyn in early 1990s. While at College of DuPage, Marisol, a Mexican descendant who speaks conversational Italian, won the prestigious National Speech and Theater Championship Award for 2 years.


In Justice

Career:

In 1996, Marisol Nichols began working on the small screen giving guest appearances on the TV series "My Guys," "Due South" and "Beverly Hills, 90210." The next year, she appeared on made-for-TV movie Friends 'Til the End (starring Shannen Doherty) and guest starred on an episode of the hit medical drama "ER" and CBS original mystery series "Diagnosis: Murder." She also made her big screen debut in Stephen Kessler's comedy Vegas Vacation (1997), as Audrey Griswold, the teenage daughter of the fictitious Griswold family (Chevy Chase and Beverly D'Angelo played her parents while Ethan Embry as her teen brother).

Following her film debut, Marisol went to join David Arquette, Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox Arquette and Sarah Michelle Gellar in Wes Craven's teen horror Scream 2 (1997) and with Jennifer Love Hewitt, Ethan Embry and Seth Green in Harry Elfont and Deborah Kaplan's high school comedy Can't Hardly Wait (1998). She subsequently was seen in Jim Abrahams' primarily spoof of The Godfather movie, Jane Austen's Mafia! (1998; starring Jay Mohr), writer-director Mike Binder's comedy The Sex Monster (1999; starring Mike Binder and Mariel Hemingway) and Frank Oz's comedy Bowfinger (1999; starring Steve Martin and Eddie Murphy). Meanwhile, she was spotted as a guest on a September 1999 episode of the comedy show “Odd Man Out” and had a recurring role on ABC’s sitcom "Boy Meets World."

The new millennium saw the fetching Marisol appeared on an episode of UPN’s sitcom "Malcolm & Eddie" before starring as Sirena, a devoted swimmer and the privileged daughter of a wealthy L.A. contractor who has a romance with a boy (played by Nicholas Gonzalez) from the wrong side of town, in the touching romantic drama The Princess & the Barrio Boy (2000; TV). Afterward, she portrayed Meriam Al-Khalifa, a Bahraini princess who had forbidden love with a U.S. Marine (played by Mark-Paul Gosselaar), in the true story-based TV movie The Princess & the Marine (2001). She also played a role in writer-director Philip Euling's 4-minute comedy Laud Weiner (2001; starring David Hyde Pierce), which won Best Short Film at the Wine Country Film Festival in 2002.

Marisol spent the following years guest starring in a number of TV series, including ABC's spy-fi series starring Jennifer Garner, "Alias," the brief-lived sci-fi drama "The Twilight Zone," Lifetime's popular cop drama "The Division" and NBC's hit sitcom "Friends." And after appearing in Drew Johnson's classic Americana love story movie The Road Home (2003), Marisol again gave guest spots in such acclaimed series as CBS' Emmy Award-winning crime drama "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," NBC's cop drama "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," FX Networks' drama starring Dylan Walsh and Julian McMahon, "Nip/Tuck," and The WB's supernatural drama "Charmed." She also costarred with Scott Glenn and Tom Skerritt in Homeland Security, a war drama TV movie which was intended as a pilot for a series which never materialized.

In 2004, Marisol had a recurring role as Elisa on CBS' an hour-long fictional show about a police division that specializes in investigating unsolved crimes, "Cold Case" and played Detective Karen Bettancourt on ABC's brief-lived crime drama "Blind Justice" in 2005. Recently, moviegoers caught her appearing as head FBI agent Liliana Morales in John Whitesell's comedy film Big Momma's House 2 (2006), starring Martin Lawrence. She is currently starring as Sonya Quintano on ABC's police procedural drama series "In Justice" (with Jason O'Mara and Kyle MacLachlan), which began airing on January 1, 2006. She reportedly will be returning to prime-time starring on 20th Century Fox's “24,” which returns to Fox January 2007 on Monday nights.


Awards:
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Named The Bombshell of 2007 by Vibe Magazine, as part of their Hot 100....
Was featured in the July 2005 issue of Emmy Magazine....
Was featured in the October 2005 issue of ESTYLO magazine....
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© Lionsgate Pictures
© Retna
© Lionsgate Pictures
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© Sony Pictures

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