PROFILE
Name:
Leslie Hope
Birth Date:
May 6, 1965
Birth Place:
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Nationality:
Canadian
Famous for:
Her role as Teri Bauer on TV series 24 (2001-2002)
BIOGRAPHY
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24

Background:

“The only advice is if it's a good script, do it. Follow the writing.” Leslie Hope

Canadian actress Leslie Hope has appeared in Canadian and American films and television series since entering show business in 1981. She is probably best remembered as Teri Bauer in the first season of the Fox groundbreaking drama “24” (2001-2002), from which she took home a SAG nomination. She also had recurring roles in the TV series “Knots Landing” (1985-1986), “The District” (2001), “Commander In Chief” (2005-2006), “Everwood” (2006), “Line of Fire” (2003-2004) and “Runaway” (2006). The multi-faceted performer has also acted in a number of TV films and feature movies, including “Love Streams” (1984), “Talk Radio” (1988), “Ask Me Again” (1989), “True Confections” (1991), “The Conspiracy of Fear” (1996), “Water Damage” (1999), “Bruiser” (2000), “Stolen Miracle” (2001), “The Incredible Mrs. Ritchie” (2003), “An Unexpected Love” (2003), “Don't Cry Now” (2007) and “Never Back Down” (2008). Hope is recognized as the cofounder of The Wilton Project, a Los Angeles based theater company formed in 1990.

Hope and her ex-husband, Jamie Angell (together from 1994 to 1996), have one son together. During her leisure time, the blue eyed actress enjoys traveling, which includes visiting Laos, Peru, Turkey, China and Cuba. In 2005, she went to Cambodia to shoot “What I See When I Close My Eyes,” a documentary film for Friends International.


Army Brat

Childhood and Family:

Leslie Ann Hope was born on May 6, 1965, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. As a result of her father's career in the military, she and her family often moved. After two years studying at St. Michael's University School in Victoria, British Columbia, her family relocated to Italy but the 15-year-old girl chose to stay at a boarding school to complete her pre-university training. An aspiring lawyer, she later decided to rebel and pursue an acting career instead.

Leslie was married to Jamie Angell from 1994 to 1996. The marriage produced one son.


Runaway

Career:

A native of Nova Scotia, Canada, Leslie Hope began her professional acting career while still a student at St. Michaels University School. Her school was used for a filming location and she ended up landing a small part in “Ups & Downs” (1981), a Canadian comedy directed by Paul Almond. Two years after graduating, she teamed up with director/actor John Cassavetes for “Love Streams” (1984), a film based on a play by Ted Allen. In the movie, she portrayed Joanie, a role the director created for her and costarred with such American noted actors as Gena Rowlands and Seymour Cassel.

With the hope of getting more work, Hope headed to Los Angeles in the mid-1980s and got a part in the short lived prime time soap opera “Berrenger's” (1985). She then portrayed Linda Martin in the popular CBS drama series “Knots Landing,” a recurring role she had from 1985 to 1986. She made her TV film debut in the supporting role of Shoshana in the HBO thriller “Sword of Gideon” (1986), which starred Steven Bauer and Michael York. Still that year, she resurfaced on the big screen film playing Allison, the daughter of affluent real estate developer Richard Tate (played by Joshua Bryant), in Paul Leder's “The Education of Allison Tate” (1986).

Hope remained busy with roles in the TV film “Tales from the Hollywood Hills: Golden Land” (1988) and “Ask Me Again” (1989), the films “It Takes Two” (1988, costarred with George Newbern), David Stevens' “Kansas” (1988, opposite Matt Dillon and Andrew McCarthy) and the Oliver Stone directed “Talk Radio” (1988, with Eric Bogosian and Ellen Greene). She also appeared in the miniseries “War and Remembrance” (1988), in which she portrayed Madeline Henry. Among her costars in the series were Robert Mitchum, Jane Seymour, Sharon Stone and Michael Woods.

In 1990, Hope and Charles Stratton established a theater company called The Wilton Project in the Los Angeles area. During the company’s 10 year run,

she directed, produced and appeared in a number of productions, including “Slide,” “Ghost Stories” and the award winning “Therese Raquin.”

Hope kept up with her screen presence by appearing in such projects as the buddy comedy “Men at Work” (1990), which was written, directed by and starred Emilio Estevez, John Bradshaw's “The Big Slice” (1991, with Casey Siemaszko), the independent film “The Dance Goes On” (1992, reunited with Canadian director Paul Almond), the Drew Barrymore vehicle “Doppelganger” (1993), “Sweet Killing” (1993), “Paris, France” (1993, starred as Lucy) and “Fun” (1994). Additional film credits include “Rowing Through” (1996), Bram Stoker's “Shadowbuilder” (1998), “Summer of the Monkeys” (1998), “Water Damage” (1999, opposite Daniel Baldwin) and “The Life Before This” (1999, starred Catherine O'Hara, Joe Pantoliano and Sarah Polley). Meanwhile, on the small screen, she starred in TV films like 1991's “True Confections,” 1993's “Caught in the Act,” 1996's “The Conspiracy of Fear” and 1998's “This Matter of Marriage,” and guest starred in such TV series as “Party of Five” (1994), “Early Edition” (1996), “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” (1998) and “Chicago Hope” (1998, 1999).

Entering the new millennium, Hope rejoined Daniel Baldwin for the crime film “Double Frame,” teamed up with Jason Flemyng and Peter Stormare in the George A. Romero thriller “Bruiser,” supported Dennis Hopper in “The Spreading Ground” and played Ann Key in the miniseries “RoboCop: Prime Directives” (all 2000). She also appeared as Dr. Amanda Kubiak in an episode of “Judging Amy” and in an episode of “The Outer Limits” (2000). She then played the recurring role of Special Agent Grace Curry in “The District” (2001), starred as a police officer in the TV film “Stolen Miracle” (2001) and had a supporting role in the box office dud “Dragonfly” (2002), which starred Kevin Costner, Joe Morton and Kathy Bates.

However, Hope did not achieve big success until 2001 when she was cast in the regular role of Teri Bauer on the Fox drama series “24.” Playing the wife of secret service agent Jack Bauer (played by Kiefer Sutherland), she won the hearts of critics and audiences and jointly nabbed a 2003 Screen Actors Guild nomination for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series. Her character was killed off in the show's first final season in 2002, a decision that stirred up a media debate.

Returning to series TV after “24,” Hope starred as FBI agent Lisa Cohen in the short-lived drama “Line of Fire” (2003-2004), which marked the first TV drama created by filmmaker Rod Lurie. Although the show was a favorite among critics, it failed to gain an audience and was canceled after 13 episodes. In between her TV series gigs, Hope appeared in the TV films “The Incredible Mrs. Ritchie” (2003, reunited with Gena Rowlands), “An Unexpected Love” (2003) and the miniseries “Human Cargo” (2004).

In 2005, Hope landed a recurring role on the TV series “Commander In Chief,” where she portrayed security advisor Melanie Blackston. She then took on a recurring role in the drama series “Everwood” (2006). In the fall of 2006, she starred as Lily Rader on the CW new drama series “Runaway,” but it is now canceled. Among her costars in the show were Dustin Milligan, Nathan Gamble and Donnie Wahlberg, who played her onscreen husband Paul.

Hope was next directed by Jason Priestley in the television movie “Don't Cry Now” (2007), played Michelle Winegate in the action miniseries “Everest” (2007), guest starred as Denise Partney in an episode of “CSI: Miami” (2007), and acted in the made-for-TV film “The Apostles” (2008). She then played the supporting role of Margot Tyler in the sport themed film “Never Back Down” (2008), which starred Sean Faris and Amber Heard and was directed by Jeff Wadlow. In 2009, she appeared in the TV movie “Jesse Stone: Thin Ice” (2008), starring Tom Selleck.


Awards:
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