PROFILE
Name:
Erika Marozsan
Birth Date:
August 3, 1972
Birth Place:
Újfehértó, Hungary
Nationality:
Hungarian
BIOGRAPHY
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Feast of Love

Background:

Hungarian actress Erika Marozsan made her big screen debut in the hit Hungarian film "Béketárgyalás, avagy az évszázad csütörtökig tart" (1989; aka "Peace negotiations – This century lasts until Thursday") and has since appeared primarily in Hungarian and German films. Meanwhile, American audiences could catch her on the HBO hit action thriller, “Sniper 2” (2002) with Tom Berenger, and the Oscar-nominated film “One Day Crossing” (1999). She was recently seen alongside Chris O'Donnell, Alfred Molina and Michael Keaton on the TNT miniseries "The Company" (2007), and with Morgan Freeman, Selma Blair, Greg Kinnear, Toby Hemingway and Radha Mitchell in Robert Benton's cast-ensemble drama based on the novel of the same name by Charles Baxter, "Feast of Love" (2007).

Erika will next be seen in an upcoming drama film by director Andrew W. Chan starring Martin Landau, "Ivory," and a Hungarian romantic drama film titled "Hanna Wende," in which she will portray the title character.


Hungarian Beauty

Childhood and Family:

In Újfehértó, a small town in the Eastern part of Hungary, Erika Marozsan was born on August 3, 1972, to an Armenian-Hungarian father. Marozsán is actually the Hungarian version of the family's last name.

Erika was trained at the Hungarian Ballet Academy for 10 years before attending the Academy for Movies and Acting in Budapest, where she gradated in 1995. She was a member of the "Új Színház" ("New Theater") acting group of Hungary's capital, and later the Kaposvár Theater, where she still works.

Erika is a fluent German speaker. Her favorite actresses are Famke Jansen and Sophie Marceau.


One Day Crossing

Career:

In 1989, Erika Marozsan made her first movie appearance in the successful Hungarian film, "Béketárgyalás, avagy az évszázad csütörtökig tart" ("Peace negotiations – This century lasts until Thursday"). Since then, she has played primarily in Hungarian films, including "Kismadár" (1993), a based-on-play TV movie, "Bukfenc" (1993), a based-on-play film directed by Róbert Pajer, and "Rám csaj még nem volt ilyen hatással" (1994; aka "No Girl Ever Had This Effect on Me"), in which she starred opposite Miklós Déri.

During the rest of the 1990s, Erika continued adding to her resume with roles in József Pacskovszky's drama film "Esti Kornél csodálatos utazása" (1995; aka "The Wondrous Voyage of Kornel Esti"), Lívia Gyarmathy's historical drama "Szökés" (1997; aka "Escape"), and András Sólyom's film adaptation of Miklós Mészöly's novel, "Pannon töredék" (1998; aka "Hungarian Fragment"). She also starred in the based-on-play film "Országalma" (1998; aka "Orb"), Joan Stein's Oscar-nominated student film "One Day Crossing" (1999), the novel-based "Cukorkékség" (1999), and a romantic German film directed by Rolf Schübel, "Gloomy Sunday - Ein Lied von Liebe und Tod" (1999; aka "Gloomy Sunday"), inspired by the novel by Nick Barkow. Meanwhile, TV viewers could catch her in the made-for-television movies "Szelidek" (1996) and "Három szerelem" (1998), as well as in an October 1999 episode of the Hungarian TV series "Rögtön jövök."

Entering the new millennium, Erika starred in the short-lived TV series "Valaki kopog" and played the title role in the film "Lárá." She then appeared in the German TV movies "Freund von früher, Der" (2002), "Katzenfrau, Die" (2002), and "Inspektor Rolle - Top oder Flop" (2002), as well as guest starred in an episode of the German romantic drama/comedy series "Traumschiff, Das."

After starring in the Hungarian film "Elöre!" (2002; aka "Forward!"), Erika played the lead in two German films, the 23-minute actioner "Templer, Der" (2002; aka "The Crusader") and writer/director Peter Gersina's comedy "Vienna" (2002). That same year, she made her debut in America in the made-for-television movie "Sniper 2," starring Tom Berenger.

Following her America debut, Erika was cast in Paul Hills' romantic drama/thriller "The Poet" (2003), opposite Dougray Scott and Laura Harring, and in Jörg Grünler's take on Dieter Bongartz's novel, "Zehnte Sommer, Der" (2003; aka "The Tenth Summer"). She also starred as "Jeanie in a bottle" Tabatah in the German TV movie "Küss' niemals einen Flaschengeist" (2003) and guest starred in an April 2003 episode of German TV series "Männer vom K3, Die."

In 2004, Erika starred writer/director Mari Cantu's Hungarian drama film "Rózsadomb," as well as in the German telemovies "Mein Vater, meine Frau und meine Geliebte," an adaptation of Ernst Weiß's novel, and "Bestseller - Wiener Blut, Der." Afterwards, she acted opposite Joseph Lyle Taylor in Joan Stein's 22-minute film set in 1982 communist Poland, "Solidarity." (2005), and opposite Pierre Besson in the German TV movie "Tote leben länger" (2005). She was also cast alongside Sebastian Koch, Tobias Moretti and Eva Haßmann in the biographical miniseries "Speer und er" (2005; aka "Speer and Hitler: The Devil's Architect").

2006 saw Erika in "Rokonok," István Szabó's film version of Zsigmond Móricz's novel, and "Ghetto," Audrius Juzenas' drama film about theater during war. She also could be seen in an episode of the German Tv series "SOKO Kitzbühel."

Recently, in 2007, Erika co-starred with Chris O'Donnell, Alfred Molina and Michael Keaton in "The Company," a TNT miniseries about the activities of the CIA during the Cold War which was based on the best selling novel by Robert Littell. Her last film, "Feast of Love," Robert Benton's cast-ensemble drama based on the novel of the same name by Charles Baxter, was first released on September 28, 2007 in USA and 2008 in worldwide cinema. In the film, she shared the screen with Morgan Freeman, Selma Blair, Greg Kinnear, Toby Hemingway and Radha Mitchell.

Erika is currently filming "Ivory," an upcoming drama film by director Andrew W. Chan and stars Martin Landau, and "Hanna Wende," a Hungarian romantic drama film directed by Márta Mészáros in which Erika will portray the title character. She will also star in a German TV movie titled "Umbra Mortis."


Awards:
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