PROFILE
Name:
Alan Rosenberg
Birth Date:
October 4, 1950
Birth Place:
Passaic, New Jersey, USA
Height:
5' 8" (1.73 m)
Nationality:
American
BIOGRAPHY
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Civil Wars

Background:

Emmy-nominated actor Alan Rosenberg is widely remembered for playing divorce lawyer Eli Levinson, a role he created for the courtroom series "Civil Wars" (ABC, 1991-1993) and reprised on another legal show, "L.A. Law" (NBC, 1993-1994). He later played Ira Woodbine, one of the title character's ex-husbands, on the CBS Golden Globe-winning sitcom starring Cybill Shepherd, "Cybill" (1995-1998), attorney Stuart Brickman on the CBS medical drama series "Chicago Hope" (1999-2000), and Alvin Masterson on the CBS drama series "The Guardian" (2001-2004).

Making his film debut in "The Wanderers" (1979), Rosenberg added to his resume roles in the films "The Last Temptation of Christ" (1988), "Peacemaker" (1990) and "Robots" (2005; voice). He will next be seen alongside Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Donnie Wahlberg, and Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson in Jon Avnet's upcoming action and crime film to be released on September 12, 2008, "Righteous Kill."

Rosenberg, who beat out Morgan Fairchild and Robert Conrad to become the new President of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) in September 2005, is also active on stage. He appeared on Broadway in “What's Wrong with This Picture?” and “Lost in Yonkers,” as well as off-Broadway’s “Isn't It Romantic?” and “Kid Champion.” His additional theater credits include “Water Play” at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles.

This 5' 8" compact, dark-haired character actor was married to actress Robin Bartlett and is now the husband of “CSI” star Marg Helgenberger, with whom he has one son.


New Jersey Native

Childhood and Family:

Son of a swing-era musician father, Alan Rosenberg was born on October 4, 1950, in Passaic, New Jersey. He is the younger brother of producer Mark Rosenberg, who died of a heart attack in 1992 at the age of 44. Musician and songwriter Donald Fagen, the lead singer of the rock band "Steely Dan," is his cousin.

Young Rosenberg became a member of the Black Panthers and was an active protestor of the Vietnam War during the “radical” 1960s. He studied political science and drama at Case Western Reserve University, in Cleveland, Ohio.

He recalled, “I came of age in the ‘60s. I fell in love with acting and became politically active simultaneously. I am passionate about the need for social and political change and believe our art can help transform the world. I learned back then that large groups of people could achieve amazing things when bound together by a just cause. I also learned that you have to be bold in standing up for what you believe in.”

After graduating in 1972, Alan discovered another passion, poker, and gambled away most of the money his parents sent him. He briefly attended Yale School of Drama, where his classmates included Meryl Streep. He became New York State’s backgammon champion in 1982.

In 1984, when he was married to actress Robin Bartlett (born on April 22, 1951), Rosenberg met actress Marg Helgenberger (born on November 16, 1958) in New York while both were appearing in the daytime soap "Ryan's Hope" (1975). Two years later, in 1986, the newly divorced Rosenberg and Helgenberger hooked up again by accident at a Los Angeles bank and began seeing each other. They married on September 9, 1989, and have one son, Hugh Howard Rosenberg (born October 21, 1990), named after Helgenberger's late father, Hugh Helgenberger.

Helgenberger and Rosenberg have appeared in several projects together, including the Lifetime TV-movie “Giving Up the Ghost” (1998) (TV) and the "CSI" episode "Weeping Willows." Rosenberg and his family currently live in Santa Monica, California.


L.A. Law

Career:

“It was one of the proudest moments of my life.” Alan Rosenberg (on earning his Actor’s Equity card)

In 1978, Alan Rosenberg made his Off-Broadway debut in Thomas Babe's 1977 play "A Prayer for My Daughter" at the New York Shakespeare Festival. He made his first television appearance with a guest spot in an episode of the CBS detective series "Barnaby Jones." The following year, he made his theatrical film debut in Philip Kaufman's film adaptation of Richard Price's novel, "The Wanderers" (1979; starring Ken Wahl, John Friedrich, and Karen Allen), playing the featured role of Turkey.

Moving to Los Angeles in 1983, Rosenberg landed a role in the miniseries "Robert Kennedy and His Times" (1985), playing Jack Newfield. He followed it up with a role in the novel-based TV movie "Kojak: The Belarus File" (1985; starring Telly Savalas) and had a guest role in a 1987 episode of NBC/Lifetime’s comedy starring Blair Brown, "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd."

From 1991 to 1993, Rosenberg played the regular role of Eli Levinson on the ABC Golden Globe-nominated legal drama series "Civil Wars," alongside Mariel Hemingway, Peter Onorati, Debi Mazar, and David Marciano. When the show was canceled, Rosenberg's and Mazar's characters were transplanted to the final season (1993-1994) of the NBC legal drama series "L.A. Law."

During this time, Rosenberg also co-starred with wife Marg Helgenberger in the PBS presentation "Peacemaker" (1991), a short drama directed by Jonathan Sanger, and made his Broadway acting debut in Neil Simon's 1991 play "Lost in Yonkers." He also delivered a memorable guest performance as Samuel Gasner, a patient waiting for a heart transplant who will not survive the night unless a donor can be found, in the episode "Into That Good Night" of the hit NBC medical drama series "ER," which earned him an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series.

1995-1998 saw Rosenberg play the regular role of Ira Woodbine on the CBS Golden Globe-winning sitcom starring Cybill Shepherd, "Cybill." Afterward, he appeared opposite wife Marg Helgenberger in the Lifetime comedic ghost movie "Giving Up the Ghost" (1998) and made recurring appearances as attorney Stuart Brickman on the CBS medical drama series "Chicago Hope" in 1999. He was upgraded to a regular in winter 2000.

From 2001 to 2004, Rosenberg played the co-starring role of Alvin Masterson on the CBS drama series "The Guardian." He also acted in the made-for-television movies "A Mother's Fight for Justice" (2001), a true story-based movie in which he co-starred as Meredith Baxter's husband and Eric Lively's father, "On the Edge" (2001), a movie directed by Helen Mirren, Mary Stuart Masterson, and Anne Heche, and "L.A. Law: The Movie" (2002). He also appeared in the films "Reaching Normal" (2001), which was helmed by Anne Heche and co-starred Joey Lauren Adams, Ellen DeGeneres, Andie MacDowell, and Paul Rudd, and "The Bum" (2002), a 15-minute drama written and directed by Mark A. Keeton in which he starred as the title character.

Following the demise of "The Guardian," Rosenberg guest starred as Adam Novak in two episodes of wife Marg Helgenberger's show, CBS’ drama "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation." He was also spotted as a guest in an episode of ABC's Emmy Award-winning police drama "NYPD Blue," CBS’ police procedural drama starring Rob Morrow and David Krumholtz, "Numb3rs," and Fox’s Emmy and Peabody Award–winning medical drama starring Hugh Laurie, "House M.D." On September 23, 2005, Alan beat out Morgan Fairchild and Robert Conrad to become the new President of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG).

“I am honored that the members of this great union have placed their confidence in me. I ran a campaign that offered a simple and straightforward promise. I will fight like hell to get actors their fair share.” Alan Rosenberg (on winning president of the SAG)

As for the big screen, Rosenberg voiced Jack Hammer in the computer-animated comedy film "Robots" (2005), as well as in the video game adaptation of the same name. Next, he will co-star with Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Donnie Wahlberg, and Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson in Jon Avnet's upcoming action and crime film to be released on September 12, 2008, "Righteous Kill."


Awards:
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